Binge Drinking: a Serious Problem in Young Women

Binge Drinking: a Serious Problem in Young Women

In 2011, one in five high-school girls and one in eight adult women aged 18-34 years participate in binge drinking more than 3 times per month. This study did not include women living on collage campuses or military bases. Binge drinking is a major risk factor for many social and health problems in women including sexually…

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More Younger Women at Risk for Heart Attack

Smoking and obesity are the main risk factors of first heart attack (specifically a STEMI: ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) in younger people, and especially women. An analysis of French registries for 15 years has found that STEMI in women younger than 60 jumped from 11.8% to 25.5%. During this same time period, the rate of…

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Healthy Habits Reduce Risk Of Cardiovascular, Cancer, And All-Causes Mortality

The Shanghai Women’s Health Study followed approximately 71,000 Chinese women aged 40-70 for 9 years. Among participants, common lifestyle risk factors of early death included physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, being overweight or obese, exposure to spousal tobacco smoke, and eating few fruits and vegetables. When participants reversed these risk factors, they exhibited a striking life-extending effect, especially in…

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Diet, Exercise, and Weight Are Major Contributors to Health

The Cancer Prevention Study ll Nutrition Cohort shows that  people who maintain a BMI within normal range, exercise 30 or more minutes daily, and eat a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains exhibit reduced deaths from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause mortality. For those who met the criteria above, this study shows reductions…

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Women Have Fewer Heart Attack Symptoms

Analyzing more than one million patients admitted to U.S. hospitals with confirmed myocardial infactions between 1994 and 2006, researchers found that almost 40% more women had not experienced chest pain at diagnosis, and they had a 42% higher chance of dying in the hospital. It was the youngest women patients who were most likely to…

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Tell a Friend about Women and Heart Disease

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in women who live in the U.S., and stroke is the number three cause. February is American Heart Month and the Preventitive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA) has launched a campaign, Tell A Friend. Women should know their numbers: cholesterol level, blood pressure, BMI, blood sugar, and…

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Dietary Antioxidants Appear to Cut Stroke Risk

The higher the intake of antioxidants in Swedish women, the lower the chance of stroke. Women with no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline showed a 17% lower risk of stroke when they consumed the highest amounts antioxidant-rich foods compared with the lowest amounts. In women with cardiovascular disease, those consuming the most antioxidant foods…

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Moms Exercise Less When Kids are Young

Canadian researchers reported at OBESITY 2011 that moms of children under 6 years of age get less physical activity than those who do not have children at home. This study found these women averaged 6.38 minutes less of moderate to vigorous intensity excercise each day--or about 45 minutes per week, almost one-third less than the…

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Insomnia And Short Sleep Increases Risk Of Death In Men

The Penn State Cohort Study of over 741 men followed for 14 years finds that men suffering from insomnia and sleeping less than 6 hours nightly had 4 times the risk of dying than men that had normal sleep. A trend of insomnia and short sleep coexisting with diabetes and/or hypertension brings with it increased…

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Moderate Exercise Reduces Onset of Arthritis Symptoms

The Australian Longitudinal Study of Women followed two groups of women (ages 48-55 and 72-79) for three years who had reported no arthritis symptoms. Those exercising 1.5 hours per week experienced significantly less arthritis symptoms, and 2.5 hours per week showed an even greater preventive effect. Moderately active middle age women reduced their risk by 29%…

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