Bad, Bad Belly Fat

A prospective study of more than 5000 men and women linked larger amounts of visceral (belly) fat to greater risks for cardiovascular disease and cancer. This finding remained after controlling for standard risk factors. Each standard deviation increase in belly fat resulted in a 44% increased risk for heart disease and a 43% increased risk…

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Sleep Loss In African American and Hispanics Affects Eating Habits and Weight

Nearly 30% of Hispanic men and African American women under 40 years of age sleep less than 5 hours a day. Recent research shows that this amount of sleep is associated with a higher BMI and higher caloric intake, with more calories coming from sweets and saturated fats.PositiveTip:  Sleep lessens our perceived stress and allows for better…

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Soluble Fiber and Exercise Appears to Help Lessen Belly Fat Accumulation

Belly fat or visceral fat increases the risk of future impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.  Studying African and Hispanic Americans researchers found that for every 10 grams of soluble fiber eaten daily, there was a decrease in visceral fat of 3.7% per five years while moderate exercise reduced the rate of visceral fat accumulation by…

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Bigger Stomachs, Smaller Brains?

Could it really be related? Midlife obesity has long been associated with increased risk of dementia, although the how the relationship works has been poorly understood. Researchers examined possible associations between cerebral brain volume and obesity in 733 middle age community adults. They found a significant association between visceral (abdominal) fat and low total brain volume.…

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