TV Before Bed–Robs Kid’s Sleep

New Zealand researchers found that children and teens who spend the most time watching TV during the 90 minutes prior to sleep onset got less sleep than those who who engaged in non-screen sedentary activities. Late sleep onset was associated with significantly (P<0.001) more screen-based activity (TV, video games, computers) versus earlier sleep onset. Although casualty can…

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Sitting Could Shorten Your Life Expectancy

By analyzing data from the NHANES researchers have found that by limiting time watching television (any screen time?) to less than 2 hours per day added 1.38 years of life. Cutting total daily sitting time to less than 3 hours increased life expectancy by 2 full years. This analysis is based on 166,738 survey respondents followed…

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TV, Exercise and Depression

There are many studies that have demonstrated that the more you exercise the less likely you are to be depressed. A large study recently took a look at TV viewing and exercise in relationship to depression. The study followed nearly 50,000 nurses, ages 30-55, for a period of ten years. During this time they were periodically…

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Fixing Childhood Obesity

Today's children are likely to die younger than their parents will. Why? Because of the chronic diseases associated with obesity. Right now, 66% of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. And the kids are catching up -- 32% of children and teens (ages 2-19) are overweight or obese.It doesn’t take much to…

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TV Before Bedtime Impacts Kids’ Sleep

Preschoolers who watch television, play with computers or play video games after 7:00 PM report more sleep issues such as repeated awakenings, nightmares and daytime tiredness. Watching violent content at any time was also associated with sleep problems. Having a TV in the child's room increased viewing of violent content. Nonviolent daytime viewing did not increase…

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Sitting 4+ Hours A Day Can Be Deadly

A study of nearly 9000 Australians compared those who watched 2 hours or less of TV per day to those who watched more than 4 hours. Those watching the most had a 46% increased risk in death from all causes, and an 80% increased risk for death by cardiovascular disease. This connection stayed consistent even after…

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TV Time Can Cut Life Short

Researchers in Australia followed the lifestyle habits of almost 9000 adults for more than six years. They found that each hour of daily TV viewing was connected with an 11% increased risk for death from all causes, an 18% higher risk for cardiovascular deaths, and even a 9% increase in death from cancer.PositiveTip: The human body was…

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Limit Kids Media for Their Good

The report from the Kaiser Family Foundation on media and sleep concludes their review with this statement:William Dement, a professor at Stanford University and a leading sleep researcher has written, “…my most significant finding is that ignorance is the worst sleep disorder of all.” This review of the literature on sleep and media use among…

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The Media and Sleep

The report from the Kaiser Family Foundation featured in the last post also discusses active versus passive television viewing. Here is what they said in this report:

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The Media and Sleep

From a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation we learn that recent research among adolescents regarding sleep has found results similar to those for younger children.

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