Cancer Risk Climbs with Sleep Apnea

Patients with sleep apnea experienced 3.4 times the risk of cancer mortality than those with no sleep apnea during a 20 year follow-up in Australia after controlling for leading risk factors. This is consistent with other observational studies. Researchers have been spurred by mouse studies that suggest hypoxia (lack of sufficient oxygen) may spur tumor…

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Another Problem with Sleep Apnea

The optometrist leaned back in his chair. To Chuck, it looked like a position in which to deliver bad news. “Chuck, take a look these results of your visual field test.” “Yeah, I noticed that you took longer on this test than the last time. I thought the test would never be over,” Chuck commented,…

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Depression Risk Higher with Sleep Apnea

Men and women with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher risk for serious depression. A nationwide survey revealed that men diagnosed with sleep apnea had 2 times the risk of depression, while women had 5 times the risk. Simple snoring did not increase the risk, but snorting or stopping breathing five or more nights per…

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Overweight Children With School Issues May Have Sleep Disordered Breathing

Overweight children aged 10-16 years old with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) often have difficulties with attention span, and suffer increased depression and anxiety. This study found that 30% of students with moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) received a grade “C” or below, while only 15% of students without obstructive sleep apnea received a C or lower. Conversely, 15%…

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Sleep Apnea Induced By Insulin Resistance

A growing body of evidence points to insulin resistance in humans as one cause of sleep apnea. When researchers fed nonobese rats a high-fat diet they developed insulin resistance and sleep apnea.  A second group of rats fed the same diet but given metformin (which increases insulin receptor sensitivity), prevented the elevated insulin levels and the sleep apnea.PositiveTip: Choose…

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Mouth Exercises May Help Sleep Apnea?

A set of simple exercises designed to strengthen upper airway muscles shows significant promise as an alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for those with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Brazilian researchers studied 31 patients with moderate OSA.

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