Exercise First in Treating Fibromyalgia

Exercise First in Treating Fibromyalgia

Following a careful review of current evidence, a multidisciplinary group from 12 European countries, has unanimously endorsed the use of exercise as the first line of treatment for fibromyalgia. Exercise is very beneficial in pain management, and improves physical functioning and well-being--and is readily available, relatively low cost, and has few safety concerns. These new…

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Exercise Benefits Depression

A carefully designed, randomized, controlled 12-week study of 106 adults with nonpsychotic major depression with limited response to medication found both high- and low-dose aerobic exercise resulted in significant improvements in psychosocial functioning and quality o

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Keep Moving Every Day to Lower Cancer Risk

Results of 12 prospective U.S. and European cancer studies were pooled (1.44 million participants) to analyze the impact of high vs low physical activity levels. Leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risks for 13 common cancers types. Most of these benefits were present regardless of body weight or smoking history (lung cancer excepted). Melanoma was…

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Senior Brains Benefit from Physical Activity

Researchers with the Northern Manhattan Study have found that low levels of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in seniors is an independent risk factor for declining cognitive performance compared to moderate to heavy intensity LTPA. More than 1200 participants were followed for 5 years. The data was adjusted for confounders, including vascular disease.  PositiveTip: It is never too…

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Exercise at the Extreme

Can you get too much good physical activity? Maybe, but the American Cardiology Sports and Exercise Cardiology Leadership Council has concluded that the benefits of exercise outweigh the risks associated with lifelong, very active endurance athletes. Even small amounts of exercise, including standing, result in lower cardiovascular risk compared to a sedentary lifestyle. PositiveTip: Regular…

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Too Much TV Time Leads to Worse Cognition

Middle-age adults who had 25+ years of high TV viewing (3+ hours per day) and low physical activity were 2X as likely to have poor cognitive performance (cognitive speed, memory, and executive functioning) compared to those with low TV viewing  and high physical activity. Each behavior was independently associated with worse cognition, also. PositiveTip: Turn off…

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Importance of Exercise During Grade School

Children who exercised more during the first 8 years of school showed a sharply decreased risk of bone fractures, especially during the 7th and 8th grades. This was reported by Dr. Marcus Coster at the meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. The intervention group exercised moderately at least 200 minutes per week,…

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Early Life Exercise Brings Lifetime Benefits

Data from a large Chinese study of women 40-70 years old reveals that adolescent and adult exercise significantly reduces the risk of all-cause mortality. Women who didn't start exercising until adulthood saw a lower risk also, but not as low. Exercise is good at all ages, but there seems to be an additive benefit when…

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Bullied Youth Benefit from Physical Activity

Kids who are bullied experience an adverse impact on their behavior, educational pursuits, and risk for depression. Research has found that increased exercise is associated with decreased frequency of sadness, suicidal thoughts or attempts. Among bullied adolescents, those who exercised 4 or more times per week had a 23% lower chance of suicide or thoughts…

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Moderate Exercise Yields Big Time Benefits

Healthy, low-risk people derive tremendous benefits from moderate physical activity. A study of 13,000 runners found those in the lowest quintile (fewer than 6 miles or less than 52 minutes per week) experienced the greatest reductions in total mortality (30% less) and cardiovascular mortality (45% less). It did not have to be fast: a few miles at…

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