Simple Hand Exercises for Osteoarthritis Relief

A small study of Norwegian women with limitations caused by hand osteoarthritis (OA) were randomized to a home-based exercise group or an information only group. The exercise group was given specific, simple hand exercise assignments three times per week. After three months of exercise, performance was significantly improved in the exercise group--joint pain was less, grip…

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Simple Ways to Improve Osteoarthritis

New Zealand researchers studied 206 patients suffering from osteoarthritis, a joint disease the leads to pain, swelling and reduced joint function. All patients received standard medical care, but some exercised regularly, some received physiotherapy treatments and others received combined exercise and physiotherapy treatments. After 2 years, both the exercise group and the physiotherapy group had…

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Osteoarthritis Knee Pain Relieved by Weight Loss

A  one year Danish study of 192 obese patients found those who maintain weight loss report 15% less osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain. An initial 16-week intensive weight loss intervention was followed by randomization to 3 maintenance groups: continuing dietary intervention, knee exercise program, and no intervention. All three groups experienced significantly reduced pain. and the dietary intervention group lost the most…

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Exercise and Diet Helps Knee Pain

An 18 month study found diet and exercise combined resulted in better outcomes for knee osteoarthritis than either alone for overweight and obese patients. Pain, inflammation, quality of life and pain strongly favored the combined approach. All subjects were sedentary at baseline. The diets focused on reducing calories to encourage weight loss. Those on the combined…

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Vitamin D Disappoints in Knee Pain

A small randomized, double-blind clinical trial exploring the effects of Vitamin D supplements on pain in adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has yielded disappointing results. After two years, the supplement group and placebo group showed no difference in knee pain, function, or loss of cartilage volume. Maybe two years was not long enough, but more…

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Losing Weight Protects Knee Cartilage

Australian researchers have reported that weight loss can result in improved knee cartilidge structure and reduced loss of thickness. This study involved 111 obese patients who lost an average of 20.3 pounds in a years time. Weight loss of as little as 7% of body weight preserved cartilage quality, which in turn improved range of…

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Exercise to Tolerance

Doctors used to prescribe rest as the best treatment for many health problems. However, evidence now shows that exercise is better, helping to build and maintain physical functions instead of rest.Sports medicine arose from this conflict of advice. Serious athletes knew that if they rested for as long as the doctor prescribed, they would loose…

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Is One Leg Longer than the Other?

A 30-month prospective study of nearly 3000 adults has discovered that even less than 1/4 inch of difference in leg length nearly doubled the risk of osteoarthritis. It is estimated that up to 70% of the population have one leg shorter than the other. This study strengthens the evidence that unequal leg length is a cause of…

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Women Lose Knee Cartilage Faster than Men

Women were found to lose significantly more knee cartilage than men in an Australian study of subjects with no clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis. When adjusted for age, height, weight, and baseline bone area, magnetic resonance imaging data indicated women lost four times more tibial, and three times more patellar cartilage.  All subjects in this…

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