Artificial Sweeteners Not So Sweet

Sucralose is a popular non-caloric artificial sweetener thought to be safe. In a small, early study, researchers have shown its use may predispose people to metabolic syndrome. Dr. S. Sen, a senior study author, said, "The only part that's not there is the calories--it's not adding the calories, but it's doing everything else that glucose does." A…

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Importance of Meal Regularity

Research in Britain involving 1768 participants examined meal regularity. Those with the most meal irregularity were 34% more likely to experience metabolic syndrome (a group of risk factors that raise the risk for heart disease) than those with the least irregularity. When this cohort was followed for 17 years those with more lunch time irregularity had a…

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“Eveningness” and Diabetes Risk

If you tend to be a night owl, you may be at higher risk for diabetes. Korean researchers found middle-age adults with a preference for going to bed late were 1.73 times as likely to have diabetes and metabolic syndrome. These differences persisted after adjusting for sleep length and other lifestyle factors. This early study did…

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Breakfast Habits May Predict Risk of Cardiovascular Disorders

A new study from Sweden adds more evidence to the importance of a healthy breakfast. Researchers surveyed 889 adolescents's breakfast habits and then checked their health 27 years later. They found that youth who missed breakfast or ate a nutritionally deficient breakfast were 68% more likely to have metabolic syndrome than students who ate a…

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Mediterranean-style Diet Wins Again

Researchers studied almost 800 U.S. firefighters for 5 years, gathering information on how closely they followed a Mediterranean-style diet along with specific health risk factors. Those who followed this diet most closely had a 35% lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome and a 43% lower risk of gaining weight, compared to the least conforming. Consuming…

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Breakfast Consumption Reduces Heart Risks

Recent research into the effects of breakfast on cardiovascular risk in Italians shows that individuals who eat breakfast have lower CVD risk, enjoy better physical health, and have nearly 40% lower risk of metabolic syndrome. Eating breakfast lowered the risk of having a higher BMI, abdominal obesity, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, blood glucose, triglycerides, total…

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Young Shift Workers May Have Higher Risk of CVD

Shift workers younger than 40 years of age were found to have significantly higher levels of cortisol ("stress" hormone) compared to their day worker counterparts. This small Dutch study also found that shift workers weighed significantly more. These observations could place them at higher risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.PositiveTip: The lack of regularity…

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Metabolic Syndrome and Walking

The metabolic syndrome is defined by the American Heart Association as a condition characterized by three or more of the following;

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Work More, Get More (Benefit)!

It seems in life that nothing worthwhile comes easily! A newly published research paper underscores this fact in finding the higher the energy expenditure of overweight patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program, the greater the improvement in risk.Typical protocols result in little weight loss for the more than 80% overweight patients who enter cardiac rehabilitation…

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