Marijuana Addiction Growing

A Pew Charitable Trust investigation found that marijuana addiction does exist and is growing. While hard numbers are hard to come by, data suggests about 9% of all users become addicted to marijuana (17% among those who start as adolescents). Some treatment centers report increases in those requesting help which may be due to higher concentrations of…

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Inhaled Cannabis Transfers to Breast Milk

A small study of breast-feeding mothers suggests that the breast-fed infants would consume about 2.5% of the inhaled cannabis dose. Well-intentioned parents might choose to smoke marijuana away from their infants to minimize exposure, but thus study indicates the breast-fed infants will still ingest some. While these amounts are small, the impact on the developing…

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Alcohol and Marijuana Affect College Grades

The two most commonly used substances on college campuses are alcohol and marijuana. Researchers followed freshmen from two collages for two years, tracking academic performance and monthly use of alcohol and cannabis. The lowest users of both substances maintained the highest GPAs, and had the lowest depression scores when compared to those with moderate to high alcohol…

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AAP Issues Guidelines to Parents About Marijuana Use

While cannabis acceptance in society is increasing, there are significant issues parents need to be aware of: the developing adolescent brain can be harmed by regular marijuana use vaporizing cannabis may introduce toxic chemicals into young bodies parents should not use marijuana in front of their children to avoid inadvertently encouraging its use marijuana edibles should be…

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Teens Perception of Pot Changing

After marijuana was legalized in Washington and Colorado, teens perceived it less harmful and use of the drug in this group increased--especially in the younger teens. A large national survey has found even in states without laws allowing recreational use, the perception of the harmfulness of marijuana declined significantly following passage of these laws. While…

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Marijuana and Cognitive Function

Today many portray marijuana use as harmless. With more and more states legalizing its use, many believe it has no long-term effects on memory or other areas of cognitive function. Researchers followed over 3000 individuals for 25 years. Current marijuana use was associated with worse verbal memory and processing speed along with lower executive function in middle…

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Marijuana Use in Pregnant Moms

A small study of mothers and their newborns found one quarter of those who tested positive for marijuana use also had evidence of other illegal drugs: 11.6% were positive for opioids, 10.6% for amphetamines and 6.5% for cocaine. Data was collected from 2006 to 2010 in an urban teaching hospital with 5000 births per year. About 10%…

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Pot Smokers at Risk for Brain Vessel Blockage

As marijuana (cannabis) use increases, particularly in the young, there is growing concern that younger (under 50) users are at higher risk for ischemic strokes. French research had found regular cannabis users were 3 times as likely to experience intercranial stenosis (narrowing of brain arteries) as non-pot smokers. More research is needed to determine if this finding is causally…

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Smoke Just Seems to be Smoke

An animal study reported as an abstract at the American Heart Association annual meeting found secondhand marijuana smoke to be as harmful as tobacco smoke. The endothelial function of the rats studied decreased 50-70% when exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke. This impairment did not depend on THC in the smoke, and was similar to tobacco…

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Marijuana Arrests Teen’s Development

Three well-controlled, large studies in New Zealand and Australia of those who used marijuana before age 17 reveal adverse changes to developing brains and significant negative impacts on motivation, drive, and cognition. Subjects were followed for up to 30 years. A dose-response relationship was observed between frequency of use and dropout rates, suicide attempts, failure to…

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