The Five Healthy Habits that Lower Cancer Risk

Evidence from over 340,000 adults in the U.K. Biobank found after 5 years that those who met all five of the healthy living factors were 32% less likely to get cancer than those who met only one or none. The five healthy lifestyle factors are: healthy weight physically active healthy diet non-smokers limited alcohol PositiveTip: Take…

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The Five Healthy Habits that Lower Cancer Risk

Evidence from over 340,000 adults in the U.K. Biobank found after 5 years that those who met all five of the healthy living factors were 32% less likely to get cancer than those who met only one or none. The five healthy lifestyle factors are: healthy weight physically active healthy diet non-smokers limited alcohol PositiveTip: Take…

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Individuals with High-Risks Often Don’t Recognize Them

Research in Canada found many high-risk patients do not recognize a need to change their lifestyle--especially with hypertension, diabetes, and alcohol use. The risk factors most likely to encourage change to improve health were: smoking, obesity, sedentary living, high stress and low fruit and vegetable intake. Those younger in age, female, educated and with higher household…

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Lifestyle Modifications Make Big Difference in Cancer Burden

More than 28,000 healthcare professionals who met four healthy-living criteria (never or past smoking, moderate or no alcohol, BMI of 18.5-27.4, and regular physical activity) were compared with over 100,000 participants who did not meet all four criteria. Researchers estimated that 25% of cancers in women and 33% in men could have been prevented. Also, these…

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Healthy Lifestyle Can Prevent MI

Swedish investigators following 20,000 healthy men for 11 years found that each "low risk" lifestyle factor (healthy diet, no smoking, physically active, not overweight, and moderate alcohol use) was independently associated with a lower risk for myocardial infarction (MI). Those with all five healthier lifestyle factors experienced an 86% lower risk. Sadly, less than 1% of the…

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Lifestyle Change, Not Medication for Mild Hypertention?

Almost 40 percent of the world's population have hypertension, and more than half are considered to be mild hypertensives. About half of these are treated with medications, even though there is only limited evidence that this reduces mortality or morbidity. Some researchers are suggesting an overemphasis on drug treatment limits the opportunities to focus on individual and…

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Small Intakes of Alcohol Increase Cancer Risk

More than 3.5% of all cancers are attributable to drinking alcohol, and there is convincing evidence that this increases the risk for cancer of the colon, breast, larynx, liver, esophagus and mouth. Most of this evidence came from studies of high and moderate intake of alcohol. An analytical review by Italian researchers of 222 studies…

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Flu Shots are Evil? Really?

Recently we published a PositiveTip dealing with how to protect yourself from influenza. Later the same day, I received a scorching email message from a very zealous, but misguided health enthusiast. I will share just a part it (without any edits):  “There is not one ingredient in the ‘flu’ coctail of toxins that would help…

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Lifestyle Change and Depression

A randomized, controlled study by Spanish researchers has found that lifestyle modifications significantly help depression patients taking antidepressant medications. The intervention group received specific written recommendations to walk at least 1 hour per day, get exposure to sunlight for 2 hours per day, eat a healthy diet, and suggestions for good sleep hygiene. After 6…

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Lifestyle and Cancer Risk

According to British researchers, almost 40% of cancers are due to avoidable life choices. Tobacco causes 23% of cancer cases in men and 15.6% in women. The next largest cause of cancer in men is a diet lacking in fresh fruit and vegetables, and for women, it is being overweight. The use of alcohol is…

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