Do E-cigarettes Help People Quit Smoking?

An observational study found those who used e-cigarettes were less successful in quitting smoking than those who did not use e-cigarettes. An analysis of 237 propensity score-matched pairs, at 6 months, found 10.1% of e-cigarette users had quit, versus 26.6% of non-users. There were limitations to this study that suggest the need for a randomized trial. PositiveTip: Like…

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E-cigarettes not so Harmless

Carcinogen metabolites have been found in the urine of teens who used only e-cigarettes on an average of 13 times per month. The study group included those who both smoked cigarettes and e-cigarettes--their levels were even higher.  PositiveTip: Contrary to tobacco industry claims, teenagers must be warned about the potential risk of e-cigarettes.

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Secondhand E-cigarette “Smoke”

Nearly 25% of all all U.S. middle and high school students said they recently had been exposed to the vapors from another person's electronic cigarette. The long-term impact on health of this kind of exposure is not yet known. However, it is known that e-cigarette aerosols may contain, nicotine, heavy metals, formaldehyde, ultrafine particles, and acetaldehyde--each one…

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E-Cigarette Use Tempts Teens to Become Smokers

More that 90% of teens agreed that tobacco use is dangerous in the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey. While those who used candy flavored e-cigarettes were significantly more likely to perceive tobacco use as less harmful. The vapers had a significantly greater likelihood of becoming smokers compared to those who did not use e-cigarettes.  PositiveTip:…

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Exploding E-Cigarettes

The long-term health risks of electronic cigarettes must be added to the immediate concern of explosions. As e-cigarette use rises, it appears that serious injuries are increasing. A regional burn center in Seattle reports they are treating about 2 incidents per month now. These cases include explosions in the mouth, hands, and pockets resulting in flame, chemical burns,…

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New Tobacco Product Regulations

Finally, after years of debate, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has debate taken authority over all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, small cigars, hookah, and pipe tobacco. The sales of all these products, including cigarettes, will be banned to those under 18 years beginning in 90 days. Manufacturers must now comply with FDA rules on…

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No Decline in Tobacco Use Among U.S. Teens

There has been no decline in overall tobacco use among middle and high school students in the U.S. since 2011. The use of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco and pipe tobacco has declined--while the use of nontraditional products such as e-cigarettes and hookah pipes continues to rise. E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among teens…

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Vaping Seems to Lead to Smoking

Researchers following a group of high school students found using e-cigarettes significantly predicts future cigarette or other smokable tobacco product use. E-cigarette users were 4.27 times (P>0.001) more likely to use "combustible tobacco products" (cigarettes, tobacco hookah, and cigars) and 2.65 times (P>0.001) more likely to become cigarette smokers than those never using e-cigarettes. Vaping has tripled in U.S. middle and high school students in the last year! PositiveTip:…

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E-Cigarettes: Friend or Foe?

E-cigarettes are viewed as a great tool for cessation or as a gateway device to greater use of tobacco products. Research in a California study involving more than 1000 smokers aged 18-59 has found those who ever used e-cigarettes are less likely to cut back on cigarette consumption in the future. Most public health personnel are concerned…

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E-Cig Use Triples

U.S. middle and high school students tripled their use of electronic cigarettes during 2014. The rate of use jumped from 4.5% to 13.4% while cigarettes fell to 9.2%. This increase has sparked concerns that nicotine exposure at these young ages may cause lasting harm to brain development and promote a switch to conventional cigarettes. Hookah, a…

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