Cancer Risks Higher for Flight Attendants

The glamour of being a flight attendant may wear thin as more research uncovers health risks. Scientists compared the self-reported cancer diagnosis from a group of over 4000 flight attendants with a similar contemporary control group. The flight attendants had a higher prevalence of every cancer examined--especially breast, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Job tenure was a…

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A Blueprint to Beat Cancer

Yesterday, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Fund released the newest edition of Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer: A Global Perspective. While this authoratative report is over 12,000 pages, the recommendations are summarized in 10 simple steps you can take. PositiveTip: Take this "Cancer Health Check" to compare your lifestyle with the new…

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“Alternative” Treatments for Cancer

We all know unproven alternative treatments are risky. Yale researchers have now quantified one type of risk for cancer patients--the risk of death. The results are frightening. By tracking equally matched subjects for 66 months, it was found that those in the alternative treatment group were 2.5 times more likely to die within five years…

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Getting Cancer is More than Just Bad Luck

Cancer is not caused mainly by "bad luck." The authors of a recent paper based this conclusions on estimates of random cell mistakes (mutations) made during cell replication. While genetic mutations are involved in cancers, these may be caused by external and modifiable factors such as adopting a healthy lifestyle. PositiveTip: Clear evidence supports the value…

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Vitamin D and Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

Researchers divided 2300 postmenopausal, healthy women aged 65 or older, into two groups. One group received 2000 IU/day of vitamin D3 and 1500 mg/day of calcium; the other a placebo. After 4 years, the difference in any new cancer incidence between groups was insignificant--including breast cancer. While more research is needed, this study indicates supplementation later in life may not make significant differences.…

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Physical Inactivity Leads to Higher Cancer Risk

More than a quarter of adults in America age 50+ reported no physical activity outside of work during the past month--that is about 31 million people at higher risk for obesity, heart disease, and cancer. The largest demographic of inactive people was in the South. The American Institute for Cancer Research reports too much body…

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Video: Does Sugar Feed Cancer?

Each cell in our body, including any cancer cells, uses sugar (glucose) from our blood to fuel its metabolism. The foods we eat, even the healthful vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, provide this source of energy. There is no clear evidence that dietary sugar preferentially feeds tumors over other cells in the body. The connection is…

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Processed Meats Classified as Cause of Cancer

The International Agency for Research on Cancer released an evaluation of red and processed meat consumption that has created a small media frenzy. An international group of scientists, after a careful review of the accumulated data, has classified processed meat as carcinogenic to humans based on sufficient evidence, and red meat as probably carcinogenic to humans based on limited evidence. …

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Lifelong Cancer Prevention

You know healthy habits can reduce the risk of cancer and other health issues. Did you know the sooner those habits start, the greater the impact they will have? The American Institute for Cancer Research has many practical activities and tips to help you adopt a low-risk lifestyle for your home. Checkout this printable chart and place…

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Healthy Diet Helps Low-income Population

Low-income U.S. adults who eat a healthy diet experienced about 20% lower risk of heart disease and cancer. Almost 78,000 adults, half who had an annual income less than $15,000, were followed from 2002 to 2009. The quality of their diets was evaluated using the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Healthy Eating Index. After adjusting for…

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