The Five Healthy Habits that Lower Cancer Risk

Evidence from over 340,000 adults in the U.K. Biobank found after 5 years that those who met all five of the healthy living factors were 32% less likely to get cancer than those who met only one or none. The five healthy lifestyle factors are: healthy weight physically active healthy diet non-smokers limited alcohol PositiveTip: Take…

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The Five Healthy Habits that Lower Cancer Risk

Evidence from over 340,000 adults in the U.K. Biobank found after 5 years that those who met all five of the healthy living factors were 32% less likely to get cancer than those who met only one or none. The five healthy lifestyle factors are: healthy weight physically active healthy diet non-smokers limited alcohol PositiveTip: Take…

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Excess Weight Increases Risk of Eleven Cancers

Scientists have found 11 types of cancer show a strong association with excess body fat, according to a systematic review of the literature. The strongest evidence was seen for gastric, colon, rectum, bile duct system, pancreas, breast, endometrial, ovary, kidney, esophageal adenocarcinoma, and multiple myeloma. PositiveTip: Avoid consuming excess calories and engage in physical activity…

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How Exercise Contributes to Cancer Prevention

Exercise contributes many direct and indirect biochemical changes that help explain its anti-cancer benefits. A few of these include: Changes to cell-growth regulators. Stimulate proteins involved in DNA repair. Improves immunity, especially regular, moderate exercise. Helps reduce chronic inflammation. Contributes to weight management. Outdoor exercise can result in increased exposure to sunlight and vitamin D. There…

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Cancer is a Weighty Matter

The World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has found growing evidence that losing weight may prevent obesity-related cancers. Those include postmenopausal breast, colorectal and esophageal cancers. The American Institute of Cancer Research estimates that if every American were at a healthy weight, 130,000 or more cases of cancer could be prevented.…

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Lifestyle Modifications Make Big Difference in Cancer Burden

More than 28,000 healthcare professionals who met four healthy-living criteria (never or past smoking, moderate or no alcohol, BMI of 18.5-27.4, and regular physical activity) were compared with over 100,000 participants who did not meet all four criteria. Researchers estimated that 25% of cancers in women and 33% in men could have been prevented. Also, these…

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Keep Moving Every Day to Lower Cancer Risk

Results of 12 prospective U.S. and European cancer studies were pooled (1.44 million participants) to analyze the impact of high vs low physical activity levels. Leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risks for 13 common cancers types. Most of these benefits were present regardless of body weight or smoking history (lung cancer excepted). Melanoma was…

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Midlife Physical Fitness Conveys Lower Risk for Cancer

Men in the highest fitness level when tested in mid-life had a 50% lower incidence of lung and colorectal cancer (but not prostate cancer) after age 65 compared to those in the lowest fitness category. Those who who did develop any of these three cancers after age 65 lived longer when they were physically fit during midlife. PositiveTip:…

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Sitting Increases Risk of Cancer

Sitting can be fatal! Researchers in Germany did a meta-analysis of 43 observational studies that included more than 4 million people. They found sitting is associated with a 24% increased risk of colon cancer, 32% increased risk of endometrial cancer, and a 21% increased risk of lung cancer. The bad news from this study is…

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