Exercise and Air Pollution

Fifteen cities in the world have air pollution so bad that 60 minutes of daily cycling outweighs the benefits of exercise. By measuring the annual levels of PM2.5 pollution (tiny particles that embed themselves deep in the lungs) which are created mainly by vehicles and factories, scientists modeled the health effects of active forms of travel and air pollution. No…

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Air Pollution Risks

Using satellite data and ground measurements, researchers in New England have shown that the elderly are at increased risk for hospitalization after long-term exposure to fine particle air pollution. For each 10 µg/m3 increase in long-term exposure to particulates measuring <2.5 microns, there was a 3.12% increase in cardiovascular disease, 3.49% increase in stroke, and 6.33%…

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Cutting Pollution Cuts Inflammation

Canadian researchers have found that the use of high-efficiency portable air (HEPA) filters modestly improved the function of human endothelial cells and lowered C-reactive protein concentrations. Both these results potentially could improve heart health. The study was done in a small town heavily affected by wood-burning particulates. Authors suggest that their findings are very subtle,…

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Pure Air: Important in Reducing Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

There is significant controversy about the level of fine particulate matter (FPM) that elevates risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiologists studied prospective data during a follow-up study of more than a million adults and found that CVD mortality risk increased by 64% in those who smoked three or fewer cigarettes per day and doubled in…

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