Early Obesity Increases Depression Risk

There as been much speculation as to whether obesity in young girls is a risk factor for depression later in life. Investigators have analyzed national data from over 5000 young women at ages 13-17 and again at ages 19-25. They found a 1.97 increase in depression risk among those who were consistently obese, and a…

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TV Before Bed–Robs Kid’s Sleep

New Zealand researchers found that children and teens who spend the most time watching TV during the 90 minutes prior to sleep onset got less sleep than those who who engaged in non-screen sedentary activities. Late sleep onset was associated with significantly (P<0.001) more screen-based activity (TV, video games, computers) versus earlier sleep onset. Although casualty can…

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High BMI at Age 20 and MS Risk

Swedish researchers have found that subjects whose body mass index (BMI) was more than 27 at age 20 had a two-fold increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with normal weight subjects. The Nurse's Health Study reported similar findings, indicating that a BMI of 30 or more at the age of 18 is associated…

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Fearless Until They Grow Up

Ever noticed how fearless adolescents can be, and then wonder if they would ever become more cautious as they get older? In a careful study of adolescent and adult mice, researchers have demonstrated neurophysiological differences that help explain why teenagers often struggle to appropriately judge danger.PositiveTip: A legal age for driving actually does have a…

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Fourteen Percent of Fourteen Year Old Female Teens Have an STI

A nationally representative survey of the prevalence of the five most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) revealed that 24% of US teenage women between the ages of 14 and 19 years old are infected with at least one STI. Additionally, half of all female adolescents in the study reported sexual experience. Prevalence of STI in…

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Parenting Style Influences Risk for Teen Car Accidents

Can parenting style influence teen driving safety? It very much can according to a new study of more than 5000 American teenage drivers. Teens with parents who were authoritative (high control and high support) had less than one-half the accidents compared to those whose parents were uninvolved (low control and low support). Also, teenagers with…

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Teens Who Share a Vehicle are Safer

Teens look forward to the day they can drive, and parents often fear the same event! Interestingly, new research shows that teens who shared a vehicle with others in the family report only half as many accidents compared to those who had primary access to a car. Those who did not have to share a car…

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