Max Hammonds

Max Wayne Hammonds was born Aug 3, 1943, in northeastern Indiana, in the county hospital in Wabash. He attended high school and college in his home town of North Manchester and attended Indiana University Medical School in Indianapolis. Following an internship in South Bend, IN and a year of flight medicine in the Air Force, he took a residency in anesthesiology at Wilford Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX. Hammonds served two years as an anesthesiologist at Fairchild Air Force Base, then resigned his commission to take up the private practice of anesthesiology in Walla Walla, WA. He was active as elder and SS teacher in the Eastgate SDA Church. After assisting in the establishment of the Health Education Center in Spokane, he established the Health Education Center in Walla Walla. He was instrumental in establishing and served as president of the Adventist Nurse Service Agency, the precedent organization of the Visiting Nurse Program at Walla Walla General Hospital. After ten years there, he and his family took an assignment as missionaries to Bangkok, Thailand as representatives of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He served as anesthesiologist and administrator there for almost four years. Hammonds and his family returned to the States to practice anesthesiology in Hendersonville, NC for 18 years. On the birth of a grandson, he and his wife retired and moved to Kenneth City, FL to take up grandson sitting full time. In his professional life he was a Fellow of the American College of Anesthesiologists, a Diplomat of the American Board of Anesthesiologists, and a Diplomat of the American Academy of Pain Management. With his wife Carolyn, an intensive care nurse and lecturer in intensive care, while in the military and in Walla Walla, he established and directed several intensive care units. He also co-founded a respiratory therapy school. In addition, he earned a Masters Degree in Public Health and a Masters Degree in Health Administration from Loma Linda University School of Health. Hammonds was a member of the state and local county medical societies where he resided, serving as president and education director of the county society in Henderson County, NC. He is currently a retired member of the AMA and American Society of Anesthesiologists. Currently, Hammonds is quite active in his local Seventh-day Adventist Church, serving as head elder and teacher. He is teaching his grandson to sail, plays several musical instruments for fun, and enjoys gardening. He writes poetry and is a playwright for his local church. He has been published, both prose and poetry, in the international church magazine, the Adventist Review. His most recent publication is a 700-page historical novel, The Indomitable Gertrude Green (Review and Herald Publishing), a true life account of a missionary nurse in China during the WWII and Red Chinese take-over. He also writes a health column for several publications.

Is There a Good Carbohydrate?

The purveyors of popular fad diets are enraptured by the evils of sugar. Consequently, they try in every possible way to recognize sugar in all its forms (honey, dates, bananas, soda, etc.), which is a good thing--and eliminate it. However, they confuse the issue when they label simple sugar as a carbohydrate (which it is)…

Read MoreLong right arrow

Another Problem with Sleep Apnea

The optometrist leaned back in his chair. To Chuck, it looked like a position in which to deliver bad news. “Chuck, take a look these results of your visual field test.” “Yeah, I noticed that you took longer on this test than the last time. I thought the test would never be over,” Chuck commented,…

Read MoreLong right arrow

These Could Be Prevented

Over 2.5 million Americans die every year. Most people would like to avoid being in this group and live a long, healthy life, but aren’t sure how to do it. Is early death a matter of bad genetics? Limited access to health care? Let’s look at the facts and draw some conclusions. Fact # 1:  What…

Read MoreLong right arrow

New Year’s Resolutions that Stick

Guess what the biggest medical epidemic of the year was – for the last several decades. Clue:  This problem is set to become the number one cause of death because it increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and many cancers. Obesity! Every state in the union now has a 30% obesity rate. Over…

Read MoreLong right arrow

Sleep Apnea

“Yeah, I snore a lot. Champion snorer in my family. So what’s the big deal?”Apnea means “without breath.” If apnea continues for four minutes, you will die. It’s a big deal. If apnea occurs while you are sleeping, you will not know it. Fortunately, your body has warning systems and mechanisms that will try to…

Read MoreLong right arrow

What Was My Doctor Thinking!?

 “Clarice, good to see you again. Welcome back.” Dr. Wilson pulled up his roll-around stool to the edge of the exam table and patted Clarice’s hand. “What can I do for you today?” [How long since I saw this patient?]“Actually, I just needed a refill on my blood pressure prescription.” Clarice checked her watch. “But…

Read MoreLong right arrow

A Quick Status Check

Tom and Alice had a backyard barbecue on the 4th of July. They invited their neighbors, Bob and Nadine and George and Beth to join them.“Kids these days don’t know anything about what happens on the 4th of July,” Bob said around a mouthful of sandwich. “In my day, we decorated our bikes and rode…

Read MoreLong right arrow

Beware the Epidemiologic Dragon

A recent online health service noted that “40% of cancers are due to avoidable life choices....Tobacco causes 23% of [cancer] cases in men and 15.6% of cases in women. The next largest cause of cancer in men was lack of fruits and vegetables in their diets...”Hold it right there! When someone says that a certain…

Read MoreLong right arrow

If a Little Bit is Good . . .

“If I take two fish oil pills a day to increase my intake of omage-3 fatty acids, four pills a day would be better. If I drink 8 glasses of water a day to make sure my kidneys are functioning well, 12 glasses of water would be better. If I run 5 miles a day…

Read MoreLong right arrow

Aspirin, the 100-year-old Medicine

Dr. Ron Atchison, internist, waited outside his patient’s room while the current group of medical students and residents filed out behind him. He motioned them to follow him down the hall to a small conference room. When they had all crowded in, he spoke.“This is just for the medical students. The rest of you hold…

Read MoreLong right arrow