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testosterone

Testosterone -- the New Male Miracle Medicine

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A casual perusal of night time television, the sports channels, or the masculine adventure channels will reveal a plethora of ads for testosterone therapy for men who think they have low “T” (testosterone). While twenty-five percent of the males over age 45 have lower than normal testosterone levels, only a small segment of these males have any symptoms of low testosterone which include: decreased libido, depression, osteoporosis, decreased energy.

In fact, most of the time these symptoms can be attributed to other poor health entities such as high blood pressure, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease, high cholesterol, poor peripheral circulation, overweight, or lack of exercise.

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Soy Safe in Men with Low Testosterone

Soy phytoestrogens lowered triglycerides, C-reactive protein and diastolic BP.

There has been some concern that use of soy products might lower male testosterone levels due to the phytoestrogens mimicking testosterone in the body. However, researchers reported a randomized trial where men 55-70 years old with low testosterone levels ate soy protein bars with or without soy phytoestrogens. Results demonstrated there was no risk and in fact demonstrated positive benefits.

PositiveTip: Low "T" or not, it seems safe to consume soy products--even supplements, though not necessarily recommended.

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"T" May Not Be Good for the Heart

Due to accumulating evidence, the U.S. FDA is reassessing the safety of "T".

On this day of hearts, new information questions the safety of testosterone or "T" supplements. A large observational study compared those who received prescriptions for "T" with those who took Cialis (sildenafil and tadalafil). In younger patients with previous myocardial infarctions (MIs), and in older patients without a history of MI, the rate of MI was about two times that of those on Cialis within the first three months of use.

PositiveTip: Think carefully before considering supplemental "T".