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Still Get Big Sweet Drinks in NY

New York judge sours ban on the size of sweet-drinks.

Several months ago we reported that New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg intended to limit the serving size of sugar-laden sodas. Now a N.Y. Supreme Court judge has ruled that ban as unconstitutional and "fraught with arbitrary and capricious consequences." Indeed there were loopholes in this proposed rule. Hot chocolate would have been limited to small or medium sized cups, but milkshakes of any size could be served (because they are more than 51% milk).

PositiveTip: Limit your intake of sweetened drinks by the choice yourself!

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You Can Still Get Big Sweet Drinks in NY

New York judge sours ban on the size of sweet drinks.

Several months ago, we reported that New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg intended to limit the serving size of sugar-laden sodas. Now, a N.Y. Supreme Court judge has ruled that the ban is unconstitutional and "fraught with arbitrary and capricious consequences." Indeed, there were loopholes in the proposed rule. For example, hot chocolate would have been limited to small- or medium-sized cups, but milkshakes of any size could be served because they are more than 51% milk.

PositiveTip: Limit your intake of sweetened drinks by making the choice yourself!

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Is it the Sugar?

Sugar consumption could be a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.

Experimental and observational studies link sugar intake with the development of type 2 diabetes. Using econometric models of data from 175 countries, researchers have found that a 150 kcal/person/day increase in sugar availability (approximately 1 can of soda daily) increases the prevalence of diabetes by 1.1% (p = <0.001>) after controlling for a number of factors, including obesity and sedentary living. The authors state further testing is needed.

PositiveTip: Refined sugar consumption should be limited to help maintain good health and prevent disease.

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Too Much of a Sweet Thing

Americans consume an average of 23 teaspoons of added sugar a day.

Frustrated by trying to find how much sugar is in an item by reading the food label? Help may be on the way! The Center for Science in the Public Interest has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to set limits for safe levels of added sugar and to specifically include the amount in Nutrition Facts labels. Too much sugar is a risk factor for heart disease, obesity, and tooth decay. See how easily we get too much of the sweet stuff [infographic].

PositiveTip: Put a padlock on the sugar bowl today!

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The Truth About Sugary Drinks

The sugar hidden in many drinks is sabotaging our health.

The regular consumption of high-sugar beverages may lead to significant weight gain and its serious consequences, and can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Become aware of how much sugar is in soda, juice, and sports drinks. You may be surprised to find just how bad that favorite beverage is for your health.

PositiveTip: Avoid the empty and usually unnecessary calories contained in sugar-sweetened drinks.

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Dessert for Breakfast?

Are your kids eating camouflaged cookies for breakfast? Look again!

It is sad that the top selling children's breakfast cereals are still loaded with sugar. In fact, one cup of the most popular contain more sugar than a Twinkie! According to the Environmental Working Group, less than a quarter of these cereals even meet the proposed federal recommendations. In addition to sugar, these cereals are high in sodium and contain artificial flavors and colors.

PositiveTip: Parents: read the ingredient lists and food labels, do the simple math, and only place wholesome, healthy cereals on your table.

Soda Clogs Arteries Even in Skinny Women

Sugary drinks create heart risks for women even if they are normal weight. This is the finding of a study presented at the American Heart Association meetings in Florida by Dr. Christina Shay.

In this study, 4000 women from 45-84 years of age were followed for 5 years. Women who drank two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day were compared to women who drank one or less daily. 

Women drinking two or more sugary drinks per day were four times as likely to develop high triglycerides. This was true for skinny women as well as those who were overweight. Elevated triglycerides are a risk factor for heart disease. So, sodas in the daily diet can clog your arteries, leading to heart attacks and death. 

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Sugar Counteracts the Anti-inflamatory Effects of Essential Oils

Sugar can negate the beneficial effects of omega 3 fats in mice.

Among the many benefits of the polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (omega-3 fats) is that they protect against high-fat diet induced obesity and the inflammation of fat cells  Researchers have found that excess table sugar (sucrose) added to the diets of mice significantly reduced the anti-inflammatory properties of these beneficial fats, and increased obesity.

PositiveTip: How much sugar are you using? Too much may counteract the good fats found in nuts, plant oils and some fish.

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High Fat, Sugar Intake Tilts Hormones Toward Weight Gain

High fat and sugar intake may change hormone secretion toward weight gain.

Diets with higher levels of fat and sugar appear to change hormone levels in favor of weight gain. Consuming high fat and sugar foods increases insulin and ghrelin, two hormones that are related to weight gain while decreasing leptin, which aids in weight loss.

PositiveTip: Consuming a vegetarian or Mediterranean type diet can aid efforts to lose weight.

Sugar Lowers Good Cholesterol Levels

A diet high in fats, particularly saturated fat, raises cholesterol levels and increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. In addition, a recent nationwide survey of 6000 adults, who were not diabetic, found that eating more foods sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup or table sugar causes negative effects on lipids in ways not clearly understood before.Sugar Intake and Low HDL-C.