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e-cigarettes

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Secondhand E-cigarette "Smoke"

E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco products among U.S. youth.

Nearly 25% of all all U.S. middle and high school students said they recently had been exposed to the vapors from another person's electronic cigarette. The long-term impact on health of this kind of exposure is not yet known. However, it is known that e-cigarette aerosols may contain, nicotine, heavy metals, formaldehyde, ultrafine particles, and acetaldehyde--each one potentially dangerous to health.

PositiveTip: It is important for all to avoid exposure to the aerosols of e-cigarettes--and to support inclusion of these devices in indoor clean air regulations.

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E-Cigarette Use Tempts Teens to Become Smokers

Flavored e-cigarette use by kids likely to become a gateway to real cigarettes.

More that 90% of teens agreed that tobacco use is dangerous in the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey. While those who used candy flavored e-cigarettes were significantly more likely to perceive tobacco use as less harmful. The vapers had a significantly greater likelihood of becoming smokers compared to those who did not use e-cigarettes. 

PositiveTip: Encourage your teens to avoid e-cigarettes in any form to lower their risk of becoming tobacco users.

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Exploding E-Cigarettes

A Seattle burn center has seen 15 cases of exploding e-cigarettes in 9 months.

The long-term health risks of electronic cigarettes must be added to the immediate concern of explosions. As e-cigarette use rises, it appears that serious injuries are increasing. A regional burn center in Seattle reports they are treating about 2 incidents per month now. These cases include explosions in the mouth, hands, and pockets resulting in flame, chemical burns, and flying object injuries.

PositiveTip: Avoid the dangers, short- and long-term, of e-cigarettes by simply avoiding their use.

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New Tobacco Product Regulations

U.S. FDA now regulating all forms of tobacco, including e-cigarettes and hookahs.

Finally, after years of debate, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has debate taken authority over all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, small cigars, hookah, and pipe tobacco. The sales of all these products, including cigarettes, will be banned to those under 18 years beginning in 90 days. Manufacturers must now comply with FDA rules on reporting all ingredients used and placement of health warnings on packaging and advertising.

PositiveTip: Evidence strongly supports there is no safe form of tobacco. Each one poses significant health risks.

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No Decline in Tobacco Use Among U.S. Teens

Tobacco continues to be the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S.

There has been no decline in overall tobacco use among middle and high school students in the U.S. since 2011. The use of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco and pipe tobacco has declined--while the use of nontraditional products such as e-cigarettes and hookah pipes continues to rise. E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among teens today. Sadly these products remain unregulated.

PositiveTip: No form of tobacco use is safe. Nicotine is an addictive drug that may cause permanent harm to brain development.

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Vaping Seems to Lead to Smoking

Vaping increases the risk of teens later becoming smokers by four-fold.

Researchers following a group of high school students found using e-cigarettes significantly predicts future cigarette or other smokable tobacco product use. E-cigarette users were 4.27 times (P>0.001) more likely to use "combustible tobacco products" (cigarettes, tobacco hookah, and cigars) and 2.65 times (P>0.001) more likely to become cigarette smokers than those never using e-cigarettes. Vaping has tripled in U.S. middle and high school students in the last year!

PositiveTip: Inhaling an addictive substance is not good for anyone. Support swift regulation of these dangerous products.

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E-Cigarettes: Friend or Foe?

Ads for e-cigarettes take us back to the days of Joe Camel!

E-cigarettes are viewed as a great tool for cessation or as a gateway device to greater use of tobacco products. Research in a California study involving more than 1000 smokers aged 18-59 has found those who ever used e-cigarettes are less likely to cut back on cigarette consumption in the future. Most public health personnel are concerned about these devices--especially as popularity grows in youth. More research is needed.

PositiveTip: For good health avoid all forms of smoking, including e-cigarettes. 

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E-Cig Use Triples

U.S. FDA intends to regulate e-cigarette use.

U.S. middle and high school students tripled their use of electronic cigarettes during 2014. The rate of use jumped from 4.5% to 13.4% while cigarettes fell to 9.2%. This increase has sparked concerns that nicotine exposure at these young ages may cause lasting harm to brain development and promote a switch to conventional cigarettes. Hookah, a particularly harmful method of smoking, almost doubled in the same time period. 

PositiveTip: Avoid all forms of tobacco at all ages for maximum safety.

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A Quarter of High School Students Use Tobacco

Half of all high school tobacco users used more than one product.

Analysis of the 2013 National Youth Tobacco Survey reveals that almost half of U.S. high school students have tried tobacco and almost 25% currently use it.  More high school boys than girls were current smokers, but was similar in middle school. Electronic cigarettes were tried at least once by 12% of high schoolers, and 3% of middle schoolers.

PositiveTip: Parents should rigorously monitor the forms of tobacco use by their youth--especially emerging products like e-cigarettes.

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Video: Can E-Cigrattes Help Smokers Stop?

At best, e-cigarettes exert a very modest effect on cessation.

The American Heart Association says there is not sufficient evidence to promote e-cigarettes as a primary aid to smoking cessation. At best they are about as effective as nicotine patches without behavioral support. They may also prevent people from seeking proven methods of quitting. The many uncertainties of e-cigarettes as a cessation tool is discussed in this short video.